Where to stay, and eat and drink along the Trail:

(See my separate page on the Munda Biddi Campsites for more information on the twelve huts here)

Town Guides:

The Munda Biddi Trail Foundation produces some great pamphlets on each town. These include:
- Cycle friendly accommodation
- Tours and services
- Refreshment stops
- A larger, more detailed town map than on the Munda Biddi maps
A large overview map.

I have them for Manjimup, Nannup, Pemberton, Northcliffe, Walpole, Denmark and Albany - I am not sure if there are others. These pamphlets are available free of charge at some visitors centres, or from the Munda Biddi Trail Foundation themselves. You can also see a list of all cycle friendly accommodation along the Trail here.

I also find the visitor centres in each town a great source of local information. It is no coincidence that the Munda Biddi Trail will often stop at the visitor centre when in town. They can advise you on where to stay, where to eat, and places of interest. Many have cycle specific brochures and Munda Biddi maps. Most visitor centres are open 7 days a week and are worth dropping in to.

The Munda Biddi Foundation also produce a "Touring the Munda Biddi Trail", which gives information like:

  • Safety & trail tips
  • Regional overview
  • Accommodation and services on the MB

It then gives details on each map, usually broken up into 3 stages.
I have the Mundaring to Nannup booklet, which from memory cost about $15 posted from the Munda Biddi Trail Foundation online store, however I could not see it listed on the website in Sept 2014

Another excellent source for locating accommodation in the Perth region is Experience Perth. This website also has fabulous suggestions of things to do, attractions, activities and tours for when you are not riding. The areas it covers that are relevant to many of my rides is the Perth metro area (and lots of the coast), the Swan and Avon Valleys, the Perth Hills, Armadale down to Mandurah and the Peel region.

Water along the Trail

Do not plan to get water at any streams on the map, as they are usually dry. Signs pointing to water are usually for fire fighting purposes, so only useable in desperate situations. Water is at huts or towns only (recommended that it is treated at huts), and even DPaW says they do not guarantee water will be at the huts (I have never seen empty or even very low tanks, but it may happen).

The water tanks at the huts are designed to keep the water as clean as possible, with gutter guards and no access for wildlife. However, the water tanks are clearly marked that water should be treated before drinking. Most of the water out of the tanks I have had is cool, clean and fresh. I noted some tanks had water that was tinged brown, which I expected was caused by the tannin released by leaves in the gutter (this tea colour is the reason many WA streams are brown, and how tea trees get their name). I noted on Map 3 in the May 2014 diary the water was green coloured, so I treated that water before drinking it and had no ill effects. My experience (yours may not be the same) is that in the first 20 nights I have stayed at huts, I drank the water without any sort of treatment and I had no ill effects. I think the popular sterilising methods are boiling or by using water treatment tablets (they can leave a taste in the water). I have now purchased a Steripen filter and UV steriliser pen, and treat every bottle of water. Still no ill effects.

Supplies along the way

Here is a summary on each town along the Trail to help you with your trip planning (consult each map page for more detail, or the local visitors centre):

Mundaring is a Perth hills township on the out skirts of the metro area. It has most services including a supermarket, many eating out and accommadtion options but no bike shop.

Jarrahdale is a historic hamlet with very few facilities- in has two small general stores that have just the basic food supplies and a couple of options for eating out and accommodation.

Dwellingup is a small country town with just a small general store and several options for eating out and accommodation. Dwellingup Adventures (Newton St) in town carry some bike spare parts.

Collie is a major country town with full facilities, two supermarkets, many options for eating out and accommodation. It has the only full equipped bike shop between Mundaring and Albany - Crank'n Cycles on Steere St, so if you need anything, grab it now!

Boyanup is a hamlet just out of Bunbury with very few facilities- it has a small general store with the basic food supplies and a couple of options for eating out and accommodation (the pub!).

Donnybrook is medium sized country town with a supermarket, several eating out and accommodation options and all the usual facilities. I am unsure if any shops carry bike spares but try the hardware.

Jarrahwood has no facilities- no shop, and accommodation is at the hut or the community house, and no mobile phone service.

Nannup is a small country town with just a general store and several options for eating out and and accommodation. I am unsure if any shops carry bike spares but try the hardware.

Donnelly Mill has the cafe at the small general store and and a couple of accommodation options

Manjimup is large country town with a supermarket, several eating out options and all the usual facilities. The sports shop (Sports Power) on Rose St has bike spares.

Quinninup has no facilities except a tiny general store inside the pub. A couple of accommodation options are nearby.

Pemberton is a small country town with just a reasonably sized general store and several options for eating out and accommodation. Pemberton Discovery Centre carry some bike spares.

Northcliffe is a small country town with just a small general store and several options for eating out and accommodation. I am unsure if any shops carry bike spares but try the general store.

Walpole is a small country town with just a small general store and several options for eating out and accommodation. The hardware store carries some bike spares.

Denmark is medium sized country town with a supermarket, several eating out options, many accommodation options and all the usual facilities. I am unsure if any shops carry bike spares but try the hardware. Rickett's Camping on the main street carry dehydrated meals.

Albany is a major country town with full facilities, several supermarkets, many options for eating out, and lots of and accommodation options to suit all budgets. A fully equipped bike shop near the end of the Trail is Passmore Cycles at 17 Albany Highway.

If you do stay at the huts, or even just pass through, make sure you sign the visitors log. This enables DPaW and the Munda Biddi Trail Foundation to collate information on the number of riders using the facilities and Trail. There is also a book for writing notes and your story in - it makes very good reading at night. For a sample of some of the riders logs recorded in 2015 see a Dropbox link here.

This page is the property of Follow My Ride, a website detailing off road cycle tracks near Perth and in Western Australia.