The 22 km Old Timberline Trail follows follows a disused railway line along St John Brook Creek from Nannup to Cambray Siding. It can be ridden as an alternative to the Munda Biddi, or made into a loop with the Sidings Trail.

The Nannup to Jarrahwood Sidings Rail Trail has been incorporated into the Munda Biddi trail. It is a 26 km walk (I can't say I have seen many walkers on it!) and cycle path that links the old railroad bridge in the Nannup to Jarrahwood. You will see more old rail sleepers, rail line, rivets and dog spikes on the Sidings Trail than you will see on the rest of the Munda Biddi! See map 5 on my Munda Biddi notes.

To get the full ride gpx or the ride route summary, select the "Route Sheets" tab above, and click on the download buttons for each.

See my short video of the ride here:

The trail starts/finishes near the Nannup Amphitheatre and crosses the old rail bridge over the Blackwood River and follows the route of a former government railway to Jarrahwood. The arboretum near the Amphitheater was planted in 1926 and it is amazing to see how the trees have grown in that time. The Nannup visitors centre is located in the old police station on Brockman St (just off the South West Highway) - just around the corner from the Amphitheatre.. The old police station is worth a visit.

Most of the two trails are on old form (railway line) that is ideal for easy riding. The first 7 km or so out of Nannup on the Old Timberline trail is the exception as it is narrow, windy and occasionally a bit rough and will take a bit longer to ride. However after the two pools, the ride to Cambray Siding is far easier and faster. The trails are well marked, but there can be confusion around the two Pools and the Hut on where the trail continues - my notes should help avoid getting lost!

The two trails can be combined to form a 37km loop by starting in Nannup, riding the Old Timberline trail to Cambray Siding then returning on the Sidings Rail Trail to return to Nannup. The Department of Environment and Conservation's "Sidings Rail Trail" brochure includes details and a map of both trails and is available to purchase for around $5 from the Department or the Nannup Visitor Information Centre.

Here is a short video of my ride in this area from Dec 2015. The trip started as a maintenance day with Ron to check his section of the Trail near Karta Burnu hut on Map 5. At 5.30 pm on Saturday, I started riding from Nannup to Jarrahwood , overnighting at the Community House. Sunday is my ride from Jarrahwood to Donnybrook, then on to Boyanup on the Munda Biddi. The last 20 km into Bunbury was on the road. I caught the 2.45pm Australind train, in Perth by 5.15pm, home by 5.45pm Sunday. Asleep by 8.30pm! I rode 109 km from Nannup to Bunbury, with 81 km on the Munda Biddi Trail, in 24 hours.

The Sidings Trail starts/finishes in Jarrahwood. Jarrahwood is named for the Jarrah Wood and Sawmills Company which operated in the area and operated a private railway from the district to Wonnerup, which was purchased by the Government in 1906. The town was gazetted in 1932, but the Mill closed in 1983. There are no shops or services in town, including mobile phone service. At a guess, the town would have a population of about 30 people scattered over 15 cottages. But a huge bonus is the Jarrahwood Community house at 15 Middle Rd, a fully furnished mill cottage available at $20 per head per night. Details and a map are at the Munda Biddi hut and on a small sign on the trail as you ride into town. If you are at the "back verandah" area, the house is the nearest house to the hut. I have stayed in the house for 4 nights now, and it maybe a bit basic if you compare it to commercially available chalets, but it is a bargain price and absolute luxury if you were planning on another night in a hut. Just please be considerate that the hit is run by volunteers. To access the Jarrahwood Community hut, visit Dora at 12 Old School Rd, or Helen and Mark at 6 Jarrahwood Mill Road.

The Munda Biddi Trail hut at Jarrahwood is called "Nala Mia", which means "my place" in Aboriginal. More info on the hut is available here.

Markers:
Sidings Rail Trail marker - train wheel on orange triangle
MB marker- blue triangle with yellow Wagyl
Old timberline Trail marker - white triangle or square with a black axe on trees or red/brown posts

Barrabup Pool and Workers Pool are located on the Old Timberline Trail about 10km west of Nannup off the Mowen Rd. The natural pools are lovely for swimming and at Barrabup there is a gazebo and BBQs for picnics. There is also camping available with a ranger coming around for a small payment each morning. There are 5 camping bays at Barrabup Pool, and 6 at Workman's pool, a short distance downstream. Both have pit toilets. The Mill at Barrabup operated from 1908 to 1925. There is a picture of the fine house by Barrabup Pool occupied by the mill manager, and that pool was for the exclusive use of him and his family and guests. The mill workers had to use the pool downstream, hence its name.

Barrabup Mill was in existence from 1909 to 1925. When at full capacity the mill employed 80 to 100 men, and the mill supported a doctor and nurse, a boarding house, a billiard hall and a post office. An amazingly detailed model of the mill is on display at the Busselton Museum, located in the Old Butter Factory on Peel Tce. See www.busseltonmuseum.org.au The museum also has the name plate of "Kauri", a loco that serviced the mill from 1914 until it was scrapped in Nannup in 1956.

Sleeper Hewers Camp, sleeping a maximum of 8 people, is situated about three kilometres north of Barrabup Pool. There is camp sites, a drop toilet and a rain water tank, as well as a picnic table overlooking the river. When I stayed the night at this hut in 2016, I saw an amazing number of bats. They were hunting right up until first light, so they were easy to spot. In fact, one flew into the hut at night and kept me awake until it found the way out again.

Cambray Sidings - A century ago Cambray was a thriving timber mill community, although only a clearing is evident now. The road into Cambray is narrow and may not be passable by 2WD vehicles after wet weather. I went through in March 2016 and there were some short stretches of sand (50m) that may worry an inexperienced 2WD vehicle, but my SUV was fine.

Jarrahwood is named for the Jarrah Wood and Sawmills Company which operated in the area and operated a private railway from the district to Wonnerup, which was purchased by the Government in 1906. The town was gazetted in 1932, but the Mill closed in 1983. There are no shops or services in town, including mobile phone service. At a guess, the town would have a population of about 30 people scattered over 15 cottages. But a huge bonus is the Jarrahwood Community house, a fully furnished mill cottage available at $20 per head. Details are at the MB hut and a small sign on the trail as you ride into town. However, if you are at the hut and sitting at the picnic table on the "front verandah", the key holders house is 150m to the front (although veering left a bit). When at the "back verandah" area, the house is the nearest house to the hut. I have stayed in the house for 3 nights, and it maybe a bit basic if you compare it to commercially available chalets, but it is a bargain price and absolute luxury if you were planning on another night in a hut. Just please be considerate that the hut is run by volunteers, none of them who are young. Book ahead on 97562065 if you wish. "Nala Mia"is the name of the Munda Biddi hut at Jarrahwood, which means "my place" in Aboriginal

Nannup is on the Blackwood River at the crossroads of Vasse Highway and Brockman Highway, linking Nannup to most of the Lower South West's regional centres. At the 2006 census, Nannup had a population of 501. The word Nannup comes from the Noongyar people who used to occupy the area and means place of rest or meeting place.
The land around Nannup, known in the early days as the Lower Blackwood, was first taken up in the 1850s by settlers.During the early days of settlement, Nannup was the point where people making their way to and from the coast and their farms on the Warren and Donnelly Rivers, crossed the Blackwood River. The isolated settlement grew gradually as timber mill workers, farmers and those who supplied these people with their needs moved into the district.

In 1909, a railway (no longer in operation) was built from Jarrahwood, linking to the South Western Railway and allowing the export of Nannup timber. Nannup Mill was established in 1926 as the Kauri Timber Company. The mill is now operated by Nannup Timber Processing Pty Ltd, an associated company of M & B Sales Pty Ltd. Nannup Mill is designed to mill Jarrah which is harvested from state managed forests.

GPX files I have available:

Old Timberline Trail Nannup to Cambray Siding (June 2014)
Sidings Trail Jarrahwood to Nannup (June 2014)

This page is the property of Follow My Ride, a website detailing off road cycle tracks near Perth and in Western Australia. This page is on the Old Timberline trail.